The Digital Evolution of Occupy Wall Street
 
Michael D. Conover, Emilio Ferrara, Filippo Menczer, Alessandro Flammini - Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN USA
Conference Paper
May 10, 2013

We examine the temporal evolution of digital communication activity relating to the American anti-capitalist movement Occupy Wall Street. Using a high-volume sample from the microblogging site Twitter, we investigate changes in Occupy participant engagement, interests, and social connectivity over a fifteen month period starting three months prior to the movement´s rst protest action. The results of this analysis indicate that, on Twitter, the Occupy movement tended to elicit participation from a set of highly interconnected users with pre-existing interests in domestic politics and foreign social movements. These users, while highly vocal in the months immediately following the birth of the movement, appear to have lost interest in Occupy related communication over the remainder of the study period. Full paper and presentation here

 

 

 

We examine the temporal evolution of digital communication activity relating to the American anti-
capitalist movement Occupy Wall Street. Using a high-volume sample from the microblogging site Twit-
ter, we investigate changes in Occupy participant engagement, interests, and social connectivity over a
fteen month period starting three months prior to the movement´s rst protest action. The results of
this analysis indicate that, on Twitter, the Occupy movement tended to elicit participation from a set of
highly interconnected users with pre-existing interests in domestic politics and foreign social movements.
These users, while highly vocal in the months immediately following the birth of the movement, appear
to have lost interest in Occupy related communication over the remainder of the study periWe examine the temporal evolution of digital communication activity relating to the American anti-capitalist movement Occupy Wall Street. Using a high-volume sample from the microblogging site Twit-ter, we investigate changes in Occupy participant engagement, interests, and social connectivity over a fteen month period starting three months prior to the movement´s rst protest action. The results ofthis analysis indicate that, on Twitter, the Occupy movement tended to elicit participation from a set ofhighly interconnected users with pre-existing interests in domestic politics and foreign social movements.These users, while highly vocal in the months immediately following the birth of the movement, appearto have lost interest in Occupy related communication over the remainder of the study period. Full paper
                         
   

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