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Khaled Zakaria Amin
Associate Professor, School of Economics and Political Science, Cairo University Read More ...
Meliha Benli Altunişik
Middle East Technical University (METU), Ankara Read More ...
 
 
The Politics of Foreign Aid in the Arab Middle East: Have the Arab Uprisings Changed The Practice? (closed workshop)
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Khaled Zakaria Amin
Associate Professor, School of Economics and Political Science, Cairo University

 

Khaled Zakaria Amin is Associate Professor at the School of Economics and Political Science, Cairo University, and adjunct faculty at the School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, the American University in Cairo. Dr. Amin is actively involved in research about public policy and finance and public administration reform with emphasize on the issues of public finance management, fiscal decentralization, local governance, public assets management, property tax administration, policy analysis and evaluation, and fiscal intergovernmental relations in developing countries. Dr. Amin earned M.Phil. and Ph.D. degrees in Public Administration from Wagner School of Public Service, New York University, in years 2003 and 2005 and a Master degree from Cairo University in Privatization Management in 1996.  He has been awarded research grants from the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, the World Bank, and the American University in Cairo and worked as a public finance and a public administration reform consultant for different international institutions and corporations, including the World Bank, the United Nations Development Program, the European Commission, and the U.S. Agency for International Development, as well as on several development projects in countries of the Middle East and North Africa region, mainly Jordan, Yemen, Morocco, Syria, and Egypt. Dr. Amin has been involved in capacity building activities in the Jordanian Ministry of Planning, the Yemeni Ministry of Local Administration, and the Egyptian Ministries of Finance, Education, Local Development, and Justice, and has publiched on issues of fiscal decentralization, education finance, government fiscal and institutional reform, and local governance.

Khaled Zakaria Amin is Associate Professor at the School of Economics and Political Science, Cairo University, and adjunct faculty at the School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, the American University in Cairo. Dr. Amin is actively involved in research about public policy and finance and public administration reform with emphasize on the issues of public finance management, fiscal decentralization, local governance, public assets management, property tax administration, policy analysis and evaluation, and fiscal intergovernmental relations in developing countries. Dr. Amin earned M.Phil. and Ph.D. degrees in Public Administration from Wagner School of Public Service, New York University, in years 2003 and 2005 and a Master degree from Cairo University in Privatization Management in 1996.  He has been awarded research grants from the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, the World Bank, and the American University in Cairo and worked as a public finance and a public administration reform consultant for different international institutions and corporations, including the World Bank, the United Nations Development Program, the European Commission, and the U.S. Agency for International Development, as well as on several development projects in countries of the Middle East and North Africa region, mainly Jordan, Yemen, Morocco, Syria, and Egypt. Dr. Amin has been involved in capacity building activities in the Jordanian Ministry of Planning, the Yemeni Ministry of Local Administration, and the Egyptian Ministries of Finance, Education, Local Development, and Justice, and has publiched on issues of fiscal decentralization, education finance, government fiscal and institutional reform, and local governance.


 
Meliha Benli Altunişik
Middle East Technical University (METU), Ankara

Meliha Benli Altunisik is a Professor at the Department of International Relations, of the Middle East Technical University (METU), Ankara. She is currently also the Dean of the Graduate School of Social Sciences at METU.  She was a Fulbright Scholar at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Harvard University in 1988-89 and received her Ph.D. in political science from Boston University in 1994. Dr. Altunisık was a resident Fulbright scholar in the Middle East Institute in Washington, D. C. from January to June 2003. Her research interests include Middle East politics, Turkey’s foreign policy towards the Middle East, IR theory and International Relations of the Middle East.  She is the author of (with Ozlem Tur) Turkey: Challenges of Continuity and Change, (Routledge, 2005; second and expanded edition contracted). Her articles have been published in various journals including Middle Eastern Studies, Security Dialogue, New Perspectives on Turkey, Journal of Contemporary European Studies, Arab Studies Quarterly, Mediterranean Politics, Turkish Studies and Journal of Balkan and Near Eastern Studies. 


 
Federica Bicchi
Lecturer in the International Relations of Europe at the Department of International Relations of the London School of Economics and Political Science, London School of Economics

Federica Bicchi is Lecturer in the International Relations of Europe at the  Department of International Relations of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Dr Bicchi’s research interests lie in EU foreign policy and external relations, especially as they relate the Middle East and the Mediterranean countries. She is also interested in the promotion of democracy in Arab countries and in international relations theory and theoretical approaches to European foreign policy.


 
Benoit Challand
Assistant Professor at the Kevorkian Center for Near East Studies, New York University

 

Benoit Challand is Assistant Professor at the Kevorkian Center for Near East Studies, New York University. He holds a PhD in Social and Political Science from the European University Institute in Florence (2005) and has taught Middle Eastern studies at the University of Bologna and Politics at the New School for Social Research. He has published on civil society promotion and Islamic charities in the Arab world, in particular the book Palestinian Civil Society: Foreign Donors and the Power to Promote and Exclude (Routledge, 2009) and edited ( with Caroline Abu-Sada) Le développement, une affaire d’ONG? Associations, Etats et bailleurs dans le monde arabe (Karthala-IREMAM, 2011). He has just published a special issue of Constellations An International Journal of Critical and Democratic Theory (Volume 20, No 2, June 2013), with eight contributions on social theory and the Arab uprisings.

Benoit Challand is Assistant Professor at the Kevorkian Center for Near East Studies, New York University. He holds a PhD in Social and Political Science from the European University Institute in Florence (2005) and has taught Middle Eastern studies at the University of Bologna and Politics at the New School for Social Research. He has published on civil society promotion and Islamic charities in the Arab world, in particular the book Palestinian Civil Society: Foreign Donors and the Power to Promote and Exclude (Routledge, 2009) and edited ( with Caroline Abu-Sada) Le développement, une affaire d’ONG? Associations, Etats et bailleurs dans le monde arabe (Karthala-IREMAM, 2011). He has just published a special issue of Constellations An International Journal of Critical and Democratic Theory (Volume 20, No 2, June 2013), with eight contributions on social theory and the Arab uprisings.

 


 
Steven Heydemann
Senior Adviser for Middle East Initiatives, United States Institute of Peace, Washington DC

Steven Heydemann Ph.D., serves as Senior Adviser for Middle East Initiatives at the United States Institute of Peace (USIP).  Heydemann is a political scientist who specializes in the comparative politics and political economy of the Middle East, with a particular focus on Syria. His interests include authoritarian governance, economic development, social policy, and philanthropy and civil society. From 2003 to 2007 Heydemann directed the Center for Democracy and Civil Society at Georgetown University. From 1997 to 2001 he was an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Columbia University. Earlier, he directed the Social Science Research Council’s Program on International Peace and Security, the Program on the Near and Middle East, and its Program on Philanthropy and the Nonprofit Sector. Among his many publications are: Middle East Authoritarianisms: Governance, Contestation and Regime Resilence in Syria and Iran (edited volume, with Reinoud Leenders, 2013), Globalization, Philanthropy, and Civil Society: Projecting Institutional Logics Abroad (2009, edited volume with David Hammack, 2009), Social Pacts and the Persistence of Authoritarianism in the Middle East, in Debating Arab Authoritarianism: Dynamics and Durability in Non-Democratic Regimes ( edited by Oliver Schlumberger, Stanford University Press, 2007); Upgrading Authoritarianism in the Arab World (Saban Center, Brookings Institution, November 2007); Networks of Privilege in the Middle East: The Politics of Economic Reform Revisited (edited volume, Palgrave Press, 2004); War, Institutions and Social Change in the Middle East (edited volume, University of California Press, 2000), and Authoritarianism in Syria: Institutions and Social Conflict, 1946-1970 (Cornell University Press, 1999).

 

Steven Heydemann Ph.D., serves as Senior Adviser for Middle East Initiatives at the United States Institute of Peace (USIP).  Heydemann is a political scientist who specializes in the comparative politics and political economy of the Middle East, with a particular focus on Syria. His interests include authoritarian governance, economic development, social policy, and philanthropy and civil society. From 2003 to 2007 Heydemann directed the Center for Democracy and Civil Society at Georgetown University. From 1997 to 2001 he was an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Columbia University. Earlier, he directed the Social Science Research Council’s Program on International Peace and Security, the Program on the Near and Middle East, and its Program on Philanthropy and the Nonprofit Sector. Among his many publications are: Middle East Authoritarianisms: Governance, Contestation and Regime Resilence in Syria and Iran (edited volume, with Reinoud Leenders, 2013), Globalization, Philanthropy, and Civil Society: Projecting Institutional Logics Abroad (2009, edited volume with David Hammack, 2009), Social Pacts and the Persistence of Authoritarianism in the Middle East, in Debating Arab Authoritarianism: Dynamics and Durability in Non-Democratic Regimes ( edited by Oliver Schlumberger, Stanford University Press, 2007); Upgrading Authoritarianism in the Arab World (Saban Center, Brookings Institution, November 2007); Networks of Privilege in the Middle East: The Politics of Economic Reform Revisited (edited volume, Palgrave Press, 2004); War, Institutions and Social Change in the Middle East (edited volume, University of California Press, 2000), and Authoritarianism in Syria: Institutions and Social Conflict, 1946-1970 (Cornell University Press, 1999).Steven Heydemann Ph.D., serves as Senior Adviser for Middle East Initiatives at the United States Institute of Peace (USIP).  Heydemann is a political scientist who specializes in the comparative politics and political economy of the Middle East, with a particular focus on Syria. His interests include authoritarian governance, economic development, social policy, and philanthropy and civil society. From 2003 to 2007 Heydemann directed the Center for Democracy and Civil Society at Georgetown University. From 1997 to 2001 he was an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Columbia University. Earlier, he directed the Social Science Research Council’s Program on International Peace and Security, the Program on the Near and Middle East, and its Program on Philanthropy and the Nonprofit Sector. Among his many publications are: Middle East Authoritarianisms: Governance, Contestation and Regime Resilence in Syria and Iran (edited volume, with Reinoud Leenders, 2013), Globalization, Philanthropy, and Civil Society: Projecting Institutional Logics Abroad (2009, edited volume with David Hammack, 2009), Social Pacts and the Persistence of Authoritarianism in the Middle East, in Debating Arab Authoritarianism: Dynamics and Durability in Non-Democratic Regimes ( edited by Oliver Schlumberger, Stanford University Press, 2007); Upgrading Authoritarianism in the Arab World (Saban Center, Brookings Institution, November 2007); Networks of Privilege in the Middle East: The Politics of Economic Reform Revisited (edited volume, Palgrave Press, 2004); War, Institutions and Social Change in the Middle East (edited volume, University of California Press, 2000), and Authoritarianism in Syria: Institutions and Social Conflict, 1946-1970 (Cornell University Press, 1999).

 
Sally Khalifa Isaac
Associate Professor of Political Science at the Faculty of Economics and Political Science, Cairo University, Egypt

 

Sally Khalifa Issac is Associate Professor of Political Science at the Faculty of Economics and Political Science, Cairo University, Egypt. She holds a B.Sc. degree in Political Science from Cairo University (2001), and a Ph.D. in International History from the Universita’ degli Studi di Milano, Italy (2006). She has been a 2010-Research-Fellow at the Research Division of the NATO Defense College in Rome and a Visiting Scholar at the Kolleg-Forschergrupe “The Transformative Power of Europe” at the Freie Universitaet Berlin during 2011-2012. She has previously collaborated with USAID, Cairo; Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, Cairo; MAEM-MENA Association, Italy; DAAD in Cairo; and is a contributor to the UN Arab Human Development Report (AHDR) 2009 and the UN Egypt Human Development Report (EHDR) 2010. She is a Middle East specialist with a particular focus on strategic and security studies in the MENA region. Her publications deal mainly with US-Middle East relations, Euro-Arab relations, NATO-Arab partnerships, and Egypt’s domestic and foreign policies.  Dr. Isaac is an Egyptian national and speaks Arabic, English and Italian fluently.

Sally Khalifa Issac is Associate Professor of Political Science at the Faculty of Economics and Political Science, Cairo University, Egypt. She holds a B.Sc. degree in Political Science from Cairo University (2001), and a Ph.D. in International History from the Universita’ degli Studi di Milano, Italy (2006). She has been a 2010-Research-Fellow at the Research Division of the NATO Defense College in Rome and a Visiting Scholar at the Kolleg-Forschergrupe “The Transformative Power of Europe” at the Freie Universitaet Berlin during 2011-2012. She has previously collaborated with USAID, Cairo; Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, Cairo; MAEM-MENA Association, Italy; DAAD in Cairo; and is a contributor to the UN Arab Human Development Report (AHDR) 2009 and the UN Egypt Human Development Report (EHDR) 2010. She is a Middle East specialist with a particular focus on strategic and security studies in the MENA region. Her publications deal mainly with US-Middle East relations, Euro-Arab relations, NATO-Arab partnerships, and Egypt’s domestic and foreign policies.  Dr. Isaac is an Egyptian national and speaks Arabic, English and Italian fluently.

 


 
Moncef Kartas
Small Arms Survey, Tunisia

 

Moncef Kartas is a researcher at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva  (IHEID) and the project coordinator of the Small Arms Survey program “Security Assessment in North Africa”. He holds a Ph.D. degree in International Relations from IHEID, and a Master’s degree in Political Science, Philosophy and International Law from the University of Munich. Dr. Kartas teaches Methodologies in Social Sciences at Bethlehem University and regularly holds lectures on the political economy of conflict and violence, the link between development and security and on the history and practice of UN peacekeeping and peace-building. From 2007 to 2010 he was associate lecturer at the University of Potsdam. Kartas has also worked for the Geneva Center on the Democratic Control of Armed Forces and was a researcher for the micro-finance NGO, ENDA inter-arabe, working in the poor neighbourhoods of Tunis. Prior to his work with ENDA, Kartas worked for Transparency International in Berlin and in the private sector as a consultant for German companies in Tunisia. Kartas is the    co-editor of the 2013 special issue of the IHEID Policy Series on religion and development, published both in French and English. With the Centre on Conflict, Development and Peacebuilding (CCDP) of the IHEID, he has conducted field research in Kigali as part of a joint project with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on urban resilience and chronic violence, focusing on the interaction of formal and informal institutions in coping with stress factors. He was also the lead researcher for the Peace and Conflict Impact Assessment (PCIA) for Madagascar mandated by the Office of the UN Resident Coordinator in Antananarivo.

Moncef Kartas is a researcher at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva  (IHEID) and the project coordinator of the Small Arms Survey program “Security Assessment in North Africa”. He holds a Ph.D. degree in International Relations from IHEID, and a Master’s degree in Political Science, Philosophy and International Law from the University of Munich. Dr. Kartas teaches Methodologies in Social Sciences at Bethlehem University and regularly holds lectures on the political economy of conflict and violence, the link between development and security and on the history and practice of UN peacekeeping and peace-building. From 2007 to 2010 he was associate lecturer at the University of Potsdam. Kartas has also worked for the Geneva Center on the Democratic Control of Armed Forces and was a researcher for the micro-finance NGO, ENDA inter-arabe, working in the poor neighbourhoods of Tunis. Prior to his work with ENDA, Kartas worked for Transparency International in Berlin and in the private sector as a consultant for German companies in Tunisia. Kartas is the    co-editor of the 2013 special issue of the IHEID Policy Series on religion and development, published both in French and English. With the Centre on Conflict, Development and Peacebuilding (CCDP) of the IHEID, he has conducted field research in Kigali as part of a joint project with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on urban resilience and chronic violence, focusing on the interaction of formal and informal institutions in coping with stress factors. He was also the lead researcher for the Peace and Conflict Impact Assessment (PCIA) for Madagascar mandated by the Office of the UN Resident Coordinator in Antananarivo.Moncef Kartas is a researcher at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva  (IHEID) and the project coordinator of the Small Arms Survey program “Security Assessment in North Africa”. He holds a Ph.D. degree in International Relations from IHEID, and a Master’s degree in Political Science, Philosophy and International Law from the University of Munich. Dr. Kartas teaches Methodologies in Social Sciences at Bethlehem University and regularly holds lectures on the political economy of conflict and violence, the link between development and security and on the history and practice of UN peacekeeping and peace-building. From 2007 to 2010 he was associate lecturer at the University of Potsdam. Kartas has also worked for the Geneva Center on the Democratic Control of Armed Forces and was a researcher for the micro-finance NGO, ENDA inter-arabe, working in the poor neighbourhoods of Tunis. Prior to his work with ENDA, Kartas worked for Transparency International in Berlin and in the private sector as a consultant for German companies in Tunisia. Kartas is the    co-editor of the 2013 special issue of the IHEID Policy Series on religion and development, published both in French and English. With the Centre on Conflict, Development and Peacebuilding (CCDP) of the IHEID, he has conducted field research in Kigali as part of a joint project with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on urban resilience and chronic violence, focusing on the interaction of formal and informal institutions in coping with stress factors. He was also the lead researcher for the Peace and Conflict Impact Assessment (PCIA) for Madagascar mandated by the Office of the UN Resident Coordinator in Antananarivo.
Moncef Kartas is a researcher at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva  (IHEID) and the project coordinator of the Small Arms Survey program “Security Assessment in North Africa”. He holds a Ph.D. degree in International Relations from IHEID, and a Master’s degree in Political Science, Philosophy and International Law from the University of Munich. Dr. Kartas teaches Methodologies in Social Sciences at Bethlehem University and regularly holds lectures on the political economy of conflict and violence, the link between development and security and on the history and practice of UN peacekeeping and peace-building. From 2007 to 2010 he was associate lecturer at the University of Potsdam. Kartas has also worked for the Geneva Center on the Democratic Control of Armed Forces and was a researcher for the micro-finance NGO, ENDA inter-arabe, working in the poor neighbourhoods of Tunis. Prior to his work with ENDA, Kartas worked for Transparency International in Berlin and in the private sector as a consultant for German companies in Tunisia. Kartas is the    co-editor of the 2013 special issue of the IHEID Policy Series on religion and development, published both in French and English. With the Centre on Conflict, Development and Peacebuilding (CCDP) of the IHEID, he has conducted field research in Kigali as part of a joint project with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on urban resilience and chronic violence, focusing on the interaction of formal and informal institutions in coping with stress factors. He was also the lead researcher for the Peace and Conflict Impact Assessment (PCIA) for Madagascar mandated by the Office of the UN Resident Coordinator in Antananarivo.
Moncef Kartas is a researcher at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva  (IHEID) and the project coordinator of the Small Arms Survey program “Security Assessment in North Africa”. He holds a Ph.D. degree in International Relations from IHEID, and a Master’s degree in Political Science, Philosophy and International Law from the University of Munich. Dr. Kartas teaches Methodologies in Social Sciences at Bethlehem University and regularly holds lectures on the political economy of conflict and violence, the link between development and security and on the history and practice of UN peacekeeping and peace-building. From 2007 to 2010 he was associate lecturer at the University of Potsdam. Kartas has also worked for the Geneva Center on the Democratic Control of Armed Forces and was a researcher for the micro-finance NGO, ENDA inter-arabe, working in the poor neighbourhoods of Tunis. Prior to his work with ENDA, Kartas worked for Transparency International in Berlin and in the private sector as a consultant for German companies in Tunisia. Kartas is the    co-editor of the 2013 special issue of the IHEID Policy Series on religion and development, published both in French and English. With the Centre on Conflict, Development and Peacebuilding (CCDP) of the IHEID, he has conducted field research in Kigali as part of a joint project with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on urban resilience and chronic violence, focusing on the interaction of formal and informal institutions in coping with stress factors. He was also the lead researcher for the Peace and Conflict Impact Assessment (PCIA) for Madagascar mandated by the Office of the UN Resident Coordinator in Antananarivo.Moncef Kartas is a researcher at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva  (IHEID) and the project coordinator of the Small Arms Survey program “Security Assessment in North Africa”. He holds a Ph.D. degree in International Relations from IHEID, and a Master’s degree in Political Science, Philosophy and International Law from the University of Munich. Dr. Kartas teaches Methodologies in Social Sciences at Bethlehem University and regularly holds lectures on the political economy of conflict and violence, the link between development and security and on the history and practice of UN peacekeeping and peace-building. From 2007 to 2010 he was associate lecturer at the University of Potsdam. Kartas has also worked for the Geneva Center on the Democratic Control of Armed Forces and was a researcher for the micro-finance NGO, ENDA inter-arabe, working in the poor neighbourhoods of Tunis. Prior to his work with ENDA, Kartas worked for Transparency International in Berlin and in the private sector as a consultant for German companies in Tunisia. Kartas is the    co-editor of the 2013 special issue of the IHEID Policy Series on religion and development, published both in French and English. With the Centre on Conflict, Development and Peacebuilding (CCDP) of the IHEID, he has conducted field research in Kigali as part of a joint project with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on urban resilience and chronic violence, focusing on the interaction of formal and informal institutions in coping with stress factors. He was also the lead researcher for the Peace and Conflict Impact Assessment (PCIA) for Madagascar mandated by the Office of the UN Resident Coordinator in Antananarivo.Moncef Kartas is a researcher at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva  (IHEID) and the project coordinator of the Small Arms Survey program “Security Assessment in North Africa”. He holds a Ph.D. degree in International Relations from IHEID, and a Master’s degree in Political Science, Philosophy and International Law from the University of Munich. Dr. Kartas teaches Methodologies in Social Sciences at Bethlehem University and regularly holds lectures on the political economy of conflict and violence, the link between development and security and on the history and practice of UN peacekeeping and peace-building. From 2007 to 2010 he was associate lecturer at the University of Potsdam. Kartas has also worked for the Geneva Center on the Democratic Control of Armed Forces and was a researcher for the micro-finance NGO, ENDA inter-arabe, working in the poor neighbourhoods of Tunis. Prior to his work with ENDA, Kartas worked for Transparency International in Berlin and in the private sector as a consultant for German companies in Tunisia. Kartas is the    co-editor of the 2013 special issue of the IHEID Policy Series on religion and development, published both in French and English. With the Centre on Conflict, Development and Peacebuilding (CCDP) of the IHEID, he has conducted field research in Kigali as part of a joint project with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on urban resilience and chronic violence, focusing on the interaction of formal and informal institutions in coping with stress factors. He was also the lead researcher for the Peace and Conflict Impact Assessment (PCIA) for Madagascar mandated by the Office of the UN Resident Coordinator in Antananarivo.

 
Kristina Kausch
Fundación para las Relaciones Internacionales y el Diálogo Exterior (FRIDE)

 

Kristina Kausch is a senior expert on Europe in the Middle East, democratisation, and Mediterranean geopolitics. Kausch oversees research on the Middle East and North Africa at Fundación para las Relaciones Internacionales y el Diálogo Exterior (FRIDE),  a European think tank based in Madrid. She is also teaching International Relations at the Centro de Estudios Universitarios (CEU) San Pablo University in Madrid. Prior to joining FRIDE in 2004, she worked for the German Technical 
Cooperation agency (GTZ, now GIZ) and for the Bertelsmann Stiftung. Kausch holds a Masters degree in International Relations (Dipl.-Sow, magna cum laude) from the University of Göttingen, Germany. Over the past decade, she has published

Kristina Kausch is a senior expert on Europe in the Middle East, democratisation, and Mediterranean geopolitics. Kausch oversees research on the Middle East and North Africa at Fundación para las Relaciones Internacionales y el Diálogo Exterior (FRIDE),  a European think tank based in Madrid. She is also teaching International Relations at the Centro de Estudios Universitarios (CEU) San Pablo University in Madrid. Prior to joining FRIDE in 2004, she worked for the German Technical Cooperation agency (GTZ, now GIZ) and for the Bertelsmann Stiftung. Kausch holds a Masters degree in International Relations (Dipl.-Sow, magna cum laude) from the University of Göttingen, Germany. Over the past decade, she has published. numerous articles on Europe and the Arab world and co-edited the books Islamist Radicalisation: The Challenge for Euro-Mediterranean Relations (edited with M. Emerson and R. Youngs, CEPS/FRIDE, 2009) and Europe in the Reshaped Middle East (ed. with R. Youngs, FRIDE, 2012).  Kausch  also provides regular commentary on English, Spanish and German-speaking media.

 


 
Leila Mouhib
Université Libre de Bruxelles

Leila Mouhib has a PhD in Political Science and International Relations from the Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium.  She completed her dissertation in March 2013, entitled The European Democracy Promotion Policies: An Analysis of the Parliament and Commission’s Roles in Tunisia and Morocco, 2006-2012.  Her research interests include Euro-Mediterranean relations, EU democracy promotion in the Maghreb, European studies and international relations.  Her most recent article “At the Borders of the EU: Migration and Democratization Policies Assessed” was published in The EU’s Shifting Borders.  Theoretical Approaches and Policy Implications in the New Neighbourhood (Bachmann & Stadtmuller, eds Routledge, 2011).


 
Nathalie Peutz
NYU Abu Dhabi

Nathalie Peutz received her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology from Princeton University. Her research, based on fieldwork conducted in Somaliland and Yemen, focuses on questions of migration and mobilities, conservation and development, and identity and heritage in the Arab and Western Indian Ocean worlds. Before coming to New York University Abu Dhabi, Peutz spent a year as an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Wayne State University and a year as a Post-Graduate Associate at the Council of Middle East Studies at Yale University. Peutz is also the recipient of fellowships from Fulbright-Hays (DDRA), the SSCR-IPFP, the Center for Arabic Study Abroad (CASA), the Andrew F. Mellon Foundation (Mellon Fellowship in Humanistic Studies), and three grants from the American Institute of Yemeni Studies. Her publications include articles and a co-edited volume on deportation, The Deportation Regime: Sovereignty, Space, and the Freedom of Movement (winner of the 2011 Bronze Award from the Association for Borderlands Studies), and several articles on the recent transformation of Yemen’s Socotra Archipelago into a World Heritage site. She is currently completing a book manuscript on heritage engineering and conservation-based development in Socotra. 


 
Philippe Schmitter
European University Institute

Born in 1936, is a graduate of the Graduate Institute for International Studies of the University of Geneva, and took his doctorate at the University of California at Berkeley. Since 1967 he has been successively assistant professor, associate professor and professor in the Politics Department of the University of Chicago, then at the European University Institute (1982-86) and at Stanford (1986-96). He has been visiting professor at the Universities of Paris-I, Geneva, Mannheim and Zürich, and Fellow of the Humboldt Foundation, Guggenheim Foundation and the Palo Alto Centre for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences. He has published books and articles on comparative politics, on regional integration in Western Europe and Latin America, on the transition from authoritarian rule in Southern Europe and Latin America, and on the intermediation of class, sectoral and professional interests. His current work is on the political characteristics of the emerging Euro-polity, on the consolidation of democracy in Southern and Eastern countries, and on the possibility of post-liberal democracy in Western Europe and North America. Professor Philippe C. Schmitter was Professor of Political Science at the European University Institute in Florence, Department of Political and Social Sciences until September 2004. He was then nominated Professorial Fellow at the same Institution. He is now Emeritus of the Department of Political and Social Sciences at the Europena Univeristy Institute.


 
Alaa Tartir
London School of Economics and Political Science

Alaa Tartir is a PhD candidate and researcher in International Development Studies and Political Economy at the Department of International Development, at the London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE. He is researching security and economy governance, state-building and development, and political economy of aid dependency in Occupied Palestine particularly, but also in conflict-affected contexts more broadly. Alaa is also the Program Director of Al-Shabaka: The Palestinian Policy Network and a research fellow at The Palestine Economic Policy Research Institute; The Palestinian American Research Center; and Bisan Center for Research and Development.


 
Nathalie Tocci
Istituto Affari Internazionali

 

Nathalie Tocci is Deputy Director of the Istituto Affari Internazionali, head of the Institute’s department The EU and the Neighbourhood and Editor of The International Spectator. She received her Ph.D. in International Relations at the London School of Economics (LSE)  in 2003. She was Research Fellow at the Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), Brussels (1999-2003), Jean Monnet and Marie Curie Fellow at the European University Institute, Florence (2003-2007), Associate Fellow at CEPS (2007-2009), and Senior Fellow at the Transatlantic Academy in Washington (2009-2010). Her research interests include European foreign policy, conflict resolution, the European neighbourhood, with a particular focus on Turkey, Cyprus, the Mediterranean and the Middle East and the South Caucasus. Dr Tocci is the winner of the 2008 Anna Lindh award for the study of European foreign policy.

Nathalie Tocci is Deputy Director of the Istituto Affari Internazionali, head of the Institute’s department The EU and the Neighbourhood and Editor of The International Spectator. She received her Ph.D. in International Relations at the London School of Economics (LSE)  in 2003. She was Research Fellow at the Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), Brussels (1999-2003), Jean Monnet and Marie Curie Fellow at the European University Institute, Florence (2003-2007), Associate Fellow at CEPS (2007-2009), and Senior Fellow at the Transatlantic Academy in Washington (2009-2010). Her research interests include European foreign policy, conflict resolution, the European neighbourhood, with a particular focus on Turkey, Cyprus, the Mediterranean and the Middle East and the South Caucasus. Dr Tocci is the winner of the 2008 Anna Lindh award for the study of European foreign policyNathalie Tocci is Deputy Director of the Istituto Affari Internazionali, head of the Institute’s department The EU and the Neighbourhood and Editor of The International Spectator. She received her Ph.D. in International Relations at the London School of Economics (LSE)  in 2003. She was Research Fellow at the Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), Brussels (1999-2003), Jean Monnet and Marie Curie Fellow at the European University Institute, Florence (2003-2007), Associate Fellow at CEPS (2007-2009), and Senior Fellow at the Transatlantic Academy in Washington (2009-2010). Her research interests include European foreign policy, conflict resolution, the European neighbourhood, with a particular focus on Turkey, Cyprus, the Mediterranean and the Middle East and the South Caucasus. Dr Tocci is the winner of the 2008 Anna Lindh award for the study of European foreign policy.Nathalie Tocci is Deputy Director of the Istituto Affari Internazionali, head of the Institute’s department The EU and the Neighbourhood and Editor of The International Spectator. She received her Ph.D. in International Relations at the London School of Economics (LSE)  in 2003. She was Research Fellow at the Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), Brussels (1999-2003), Jean Monnet and Marie Curie Fellow at the European University Institute, Florence (2003-2007), Associate Fellow at CEPS (2007-2009), and Senior Fellow at the Transatlantic Academy in Washington (2009-2010). Her research interests include European foreign policy, conflict resolution, the European neighbourhood, with a particular focus on Turkey, Cyprus, the Mediterranean and the Middle East and the South Caucasus. Dr Tocci is the winner of the 2008 Anna Lindh award for the study of European foreign policy.

 
Benedetta Voltolini
London School of Economics.

Benedetta Voltolini is a Ph.D. candidate at the London School of Economics. She was a visiting fellow at the European Union Institute for Security Studies (EUISS) between September and December 2011 and a visiting Ph.D. student at the Freie Universität Berlin in May-June 2012. Her research interests include lobbying and advocacy in EU foreign policy, EU policy towards the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and EU democracy promotion in the Mediterranean and the Middle East.


 
Jeremy Wildeman
University of Exeter

 

Jeremy Wilderman is a Ph.D. candidate in the Institute for Arab and Islamic Studies at the University of Exeter, where he is conducting research into the effects of foreign aid on Palestinians. Previously he co-founded and managed the internationally registered West Bank-based charity for Palestinian youth “Project Hope” (www.projecthope.ps). He is a committee member for the international relations blog ThinkIR (www.thinkir.co.uk).


Jeremy Wilderman is a Ph.D. candidate in the Institute for Arab and Islamic Studies at the University of Exeter, where he is conducting research into the effects of foreign aid on Palestinians. Previously he co-founded and managed the internationally registered West Bank-based charity for Palestinian youth “Project Hope” (www.projecthope.ps). He is a committee member for the international relations blog ThinkIR (www.thinkir.co.uk).

 


 
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