Students Are Invited to Respond Creatively to Villa La Pietra’s Acton Collection as part of this Spring’s ‘Picturing Women’ project

As part of the Picturing Women: Constructions of Gender in the Acton Collection and Contemporary Society series, NYU Florence students are invited to respond creatively to the representations of women in the art of Villa La Pietra’s Acton Collection and to participate in an end of semester Exhibition in the Villa’s Collection alongside professional artists.

'Cleopatra', Florence, Orazio Fidani, oil on canvas, mid. 17th c. Camera blu, Villa La Pietra
‘Cleopatra’, Florence, Orazio Fidani, oil on canvas, mid. 17th c. Camera blu, Villa La Pietra

Project Requirements:

  1. Attend one or more ‘Picturing Women’ Artist Workshops held throughout the semester
  2. Take advantage of ‘Open Collection Opportunities’ for students and spend private time viewing the art in the Acton Collection
  3. Respond creatively to the representations of women in the Acton Collection with your own creative work in a medium of your choosing.

‘Open Collection’ Dates and Times:

February 9, 15 and 20, from 10am-5pm

No reservation required.

Deadline for the Submission of Student Projects: April 24, 2017

Exhibition Opening: May 2, 2017

For further information contact Cristina Fantacci at cristina.fantacci@nyu.edu or 055 5007 210

Learn more about the series on the Villa La Pietra website here.

Previous Project:

See how NYU Florence students responded creatively to the art in the Acton Collection in the Fall 2015 project Food: Signs, Symbols, Significations (and Sex?) Reading Art in the Villa La Pietra Collection here.

NYU Florence Student Nicole Chan, 'Persephone', Fall 2015.
NYU Florence Student Nicole Chan, ‘Persephone’, Fall 2015.

The pomegranate is a significant symbol across cultures. The fruit has hundreds of seeds within its hull, causing many to associate it values of fertility and womanhood. In the Greek myth Hades and Persephone, eating the fruit prompts Persephone’s marriage to the lord of the underworld and seals her subsequent fate. This image Persephone is inspired by ideas of emerging adulthood and the irreversibility of time. The disfigured doll represents changes in body as one leaves childhood . The model mirrors the doll’s position, and the two almost embrace each other. They are two halves of a whole, each encapsulating a different part of life like a butterfly in the midst of metamorphosis.

– Nicole Chan

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