Category: Women

Empowering Women in Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)

On Monday night, NYU Florence students Yana Chala and Alice Huang kept the ball rolling on student led dialogues with their conversation, “Empowering Women in STEM”. The event brought together a panel of three women in tech: Caroline Dahl, Patrizia Guitani, and Svetlana Videnova. The panelists were of varying ages, from different countries across Europe, working in different fields and companies. Yet, it was remarkable to see these three women who had never met before share their common experiences and challenges of being a female minority in the tech field.

Alice Huang kickstarted the event with the dichotomy between Nichelle Nichols’ progressive idea of science, and the continuing reality of female underrepresentation in science that seems to lag behind Nichols’ aspirations for the field.

“Science is not a boy’s game, it’s not a girl’s game. It’s everyone’s game. It’s about where we are and where we’re going.” – Nichelle Nichols (former NASA Ambassador and actress)

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Vital Voices: Women and International Leadership Development

On April 19, 2017, an intimate group had a cozy discussion with Alyse Nelson, President and CEO of Vital Voices Global Partnership, on developing women’s leadership.

I was among them, and I had been anticipating this talk all semester. Nelson’s work is much inspired by former American First Lady and U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, so I was eager to hear her take on the past U.S election cycle and the “highest, hardest glass ceiling” that remained unshattered.

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Artist Patricia Cronin at Villa La Pietra

Born in 1963 in Beverly, Massachusetts, Patricia Cronin was educated in several art schools, including Brooklyn College of The City University of New York for her M.F.A and Rhode Island College for her B.F.A. From solo exhibitions in various countries (including The Lab Gallery in Dublin, Ireland and La Biennale di Venezia, Venice, Italy), to publications such as The Zenobia Scandal: A Meditation on Male Jealousy (2013), her work is internationally renowned and is becoming increasingly popular. She has received numerous fellowships and awards, including the New York Foundation for the Arts (Deutsche Bank Fellow) Artist Fellowship in 2007, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art Rome Prize in Visual Art between 2006-2007. Read more

Women’s March: Recap with Photo Gallery

On March 8, Italy celebrated International Women’s Day alongside many other countries. I was shocked to see how much emphasis was placed on this day, from the exchange of the yellow mimosas (a flower that has become “an emblem of Women’s Day”), to the discounted aperitivos, to women’s free admission into museums. The most memorable for me was the Women’s March which took place in and around the center of Florence. Here I witnessed people from all backgrounds and walks of life come together for the collective motivation to celebrate women’s achievements, and continue the fight for equality. Within the sea of people, you could see highlights of pink (a color that signifies femininity but has now become a symbol of the Women’s Movement, especially with the pink “pussy hats”), and bright flags that represented people’s identities — nationally, sexually, or socially. Young girls stood at the forefront of the march, fearlessly chanting and holding up the sign “NOT ONE LESS,” and I couldn’t help but feel comforted that these girls are our future. The boys and men behind these girls understood what it meant to support them. Their subsequent positions did not mean subservience to the females, but solidarity with the females. In the middle of the march, a group of predominantly male performers put the march to a halt to perform with their unconventional drums. I looked around at the entertained spectators and noticed the expression of the participants’ faces. They were uplifted and liberated as they danced and marched together. This march reminded me of the power that comes from solidarity, unity, and love.

 

“NOT ONE LESS”
“The rapist is not sick. He is a healthy child of patriarchy” “My body my choice”
Demonstrators waving color smoke grenades.
“Patriarchy and capital, criminal alliance”
Woman blowing bubbles in a pink wig.
“SELF DETERMINATION”
A crew of drummers breaks out into a 5 minute performance in the middle of the march.
Woman dancing to the beat of the drums.
Lady prepares to release a hot air balloon.

Black Identity: A Hidden Beauty

“Beauty is personal and political; it can be read both aesthetically and within the context of cultural studies.” – Deborah Willis

Susan Taylor by Ken Ramsay, c. 1970s

Proud recipient of MacArthur Genius Award and Guggenheim Fellowship, curator and author of multiple books including Posing Beauty (2009) and Reflections In Black (2000), Deborah Willis is a contemporary African-American artist, photographer, and educator. She is currently Professor of Photography and Chair of the Department of Photography & Imaging at the Tisch School of the Arts of New York University. She has also taught a seminar entitled “Beauty Matters” at Harvard University. Willis has pursued a dual professional career as an art photographer and as one of the nation’s leading historians of African American photography. She has also curated multiple exhibitions promoting African-American culture and heritage. Read more

International Women’s Day

Yesterday was International Women’s Day

We_Can_Do_It!

“The story of women’s struggle for equality belongs to no single feminist nor to any one organization but to the collective efforts of all who care about human rights.” – Gloria Steinem, Feminist, Journalist and Social and Political Activist

        Every year, on March 8th, International Women’s Day is celebrated worldwide. But What Exactly is it?

International Women’s Day is a global day honoring the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. The day also marks a call to action for accelerating gender parity. The celebration has evolved over the course of a century and is now marked by an annual strike, entitled ‘A Day Without Women’, in which women are encouraged to take a day off work, avoid shopping, and to wear red in order to demonstrate the vital role women play in both the domestic and global economy.poing_feministe_0
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Today Is International Women’s Day!

 

We_Can_Do_It!

“The story of women’s struggle for equality belongs to no single feminist nor to any one organization but to the collective efforts of all who care about human rights.” – Gloria Steinem, Feminist, Journalist and Social and Political Activist

 

 Every year, on March 8th, International Women’s Day is celebrated worldwide. But what exactly is International Women’s Day?

International Women’s Day is a global day honoring  the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. The day also marks a call to action for accelerating gender parity. The celebration has evolved over the course of a century and is now marked by an annual strike, entitled ‘A Day Without Women’, in which women are encouraged to take a day off work, avoid shopping, and to wear red in order to demonstrate the vital role women play in both the domestic and global economy.

 

poing_feministe_0

How do I get involved?

There are three things you can do to get involved starting today:

  1. Head down to Piazza Santissima Annunziata at 6:00pm today to join Florence’s own ‘A Day Without Women’ March. The parade  will arrive in Piazza Santo Spirito where a “feminist aperitivo” will conclude the day.
  2. Make a pledge to take action for gender parity at: www.internationalwomensday.com/BeBold
  3. Enjoy or even sport some yellow mimosa flowers to show your support

Happy International Women’s day!

Getting to Know Gail Segal!

Who is Gail Segal?

Gail Segal is an American poet and filmmaker, and a film professor at NYU Tisch.

Where is she from?

Segal grew up in the Deep South, and after earning her B.A. in Politics and her M.F.A. in Film, she moved to New York City to pursue filmmaking.

What are some of her recent projects?

In 2015, she published Dramatic Effects: with a movie camera, a book of essays about film.

In 2014, she released Filigrane, a narrative short about three French siblings exploring the United Arab Emirates in hopes of connecting to their late father who was a researcher in the area.

In 2013, she released Meanwhile, in Turkey; a documentary short about the agency of Turkish women in a time of political and social unease, and had her work published in Paradigm, a poetry anthology by Italian poet and translator Alfredo de Palchi. Read more

Preview: “Rebel Girls” and the Role of Working Women in the Fight for Gender Equality

Tonight, Mary Anne Trasciatti of Hofstra University will be giving a talk on working women and their role in the fight for equality in the United States. picThis talk comes exactly one month after women’s marches across the United States attracted an estimated 4 million protesters from Maine to Hawaii and even more overseas, according to Jeremy Pressman of University of Connecticut and Erica Chenoweth of University of Denver. The march was not only a symbolic protest against Donald Trump, but also a show of solidarity and unification among the many marginalized groups of the United States, from the Black Lives Matter movement to the LGBTQ community and even the Dakota Access Pipeline protesters. However, that is not to understate one of the core missions of the march, which was equal pay for women. On its website, the International Labor Rights Forum (ILRF) stated its mission: “We will not rest until women have parity and equity at all levels of leadership in society. We work peacefully while recognizing there is no true peace without justice and equity for all. Read more